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Welcome to Lincoln Parish!

 

Welcome to Lincoln Parish, Louisiana Genealogy & History Network. Our purpose is to provide free resources for genealogical and historical researchers. This site is FREE and will always be FREE to all researchers!
If you have genealogy or history information to share, send an email to genealogy@usghn.org and we will be pleased to include it here. If you have information for other Louisiana Parishes, please consider clicking on the Louisiana Genealogy & History Network link in the Main Menu and visit the appropriate parish. Thanks for visiting and good luck with your research!
 

 



 About Lincoln Parish...

Since the late 20th century, archeologists have dated eleven sites in northern Louisiana where thousands of years ago, indigenous cultures built complexes with multiple, monumental earthwork mounds during the Middle Archaic period, long before the development of sedentary, agricultural societies. At sites such as Watson Brake, Frenchman's Bend, and Caney, generations of hunter-gatherers worked for hundreds of years to build and add to mound complexes. Hedgepeth Site, located in Lincoln Parish, is dated about 5200-4500 BP (about 3300-2600 BCE), from the latter part of this period. Such finds are changing the understanding of early human cultures.

As the Era of Reconstruction took hold following the Civil War, a new parish was carved from existing ones in 1873 and named after recently slain president Abraham Lincoln. Word soon reached the young parish that the Vicksburg, Shreveport and Pacific Railroad would begin to run across north Louisiana, linking the Deep South with the Wild Wild West.

For one individual, this brought to fruition a lifelong dream of having people living nearby whom he could call neighbors. Little did Robert E. Russ know that his dream for a new town to be located near his plantation would eventually become known as Ruston (shorthand for Russ town). By 1884, Ruston was incorporated. Russ had donated roughly 640 acres for the town's location, and former Union Army surveyors working for the railroad had laid out unusually wide, spacious avenues among the towering oaks and pines. Commercial and residential lots were created and soon the sawing of lumber and clacking of hammers could be heard throughout the area.

As the town began to take shape, new churches, businesses, civic organizations and schools were being established. The vast stands of virgin timber and the availability of fertile lands for cotton farming fueled the booming economy. In 1900 a second railroad, running north and south, was built through Ruston. This brought even more business and industry to the area and the population continued to provide a foundation for the local economy. By the outbreak of World War I in 1917, Ruston was well established as a center for learning, a place of civic pride and as an area of economic prosperity throughout the region.

Ruston continued to grow steadily during the post-war prosperity of the 1950's. The GI Bill, which sent war veterans to college, helped fuel the local economy, causing tremendous growth at the local universities and brought many new families to Ruston. By the late 1950's, news reached Ruston that would have significant impact - a new interstate highway was to be built that would run through the northern fringe of the city. Completed by the early 1970's this coast-to-coast highway made Ruston more easily accessible, much as the railroad had done a century before. This, too, brought new opportunities for growth and development.

In the 1980's, the state's economy lagged after the oil industry went "belly-up." Ruston, however, continued growing steadily, fueled primarily by the cornerstones of the local economy, Louisiana Tech and Grambling State, which continued to expand programs and increase enrollment. The city also had its centennial celebration during this decade, and emphasis was put on revitalizing the historic downtown district. A joint effort between the city, the Ruston-Lincoln Chamber of Commerce, the Louisiana Main Street Program, the Louisiana Department of Historic Preservation and beautification projects restored Ruston's historic downtown to the hustling and bustling center of the community. More than 15 historic buildings have been placed on the National Register. Storefronts are again filled, as are most parking spaces. The restoration has been a "shot in the arm" for the local economy and has helped draw the community closer to its roots.

The parish has a total area of 472 square miles, of which 471 square miles is land and 1 square mile (0.19%) is water. The population recorded in the 1900 Federal Census was 15,898. The 2010 census recorded 41,857 residents in the Parish.

Neigboring parishes are Union Parish (north), Ouachita Parish (east), Jackson Parish (south), Bienville Parish (southwest), and Claiborne Parish (northwest). Communities in the parish include Choudrant, Downsville, Dubach, Grambling, Ruston, Simsboro, and Vienna.

 

 

 

 Lincoln Parish Records


Birth Records - The Louisiana State office maintains records for 100 years after the date of birth. Birth records are considered confidential for the first 100 years. For current information on who may obtain a birth record as well as how to submit a request visit the Office of Public Health, Vital Records Registry website or write to them at PO Box 60630, New Orleans, LA 70160.

Birth records older than 100 years are available through the Louisiana State Archives, 3851 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, LA 70809. (225) 922-1000.

 

Death Records - The Louisiana State office maintains records for 100 years after the date of death. Death records are considered confidential for the first 100 years. For current information on who may obtain a death record as well as how to submit a request visit the Office of Public Health, Vital Records Registry website or write to them at PO Box 60630, New Orleans, LA 70160.

Death records older than 100 years are available through the Louisiana State Archives, 3851 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, LA 70809. (225) 922-1000.

 

Marriage Records - For current information on how to submit a request for a certified copy of an Orleans Parish marriage record less than 50 years old, see the Louisiana Office of Public Health Director, Vital Records and Statistics website or write to PO Box 60630, New Orleans, LA 70160.

Certified copies for the parish are issued by Clerk of Court. For the address of the parish Clerk of Court visit the Lincoln Parish Important Addresses page.

Marriage records over 50 years are stored by the Louisiana State Archives, 3851 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, LA 70809. (225) 922-1000.

 

Divorce Records - To obtain current information on how to submit a request for a certified copy of divorce records contact the Clerk of Court. For the address of the parish Clerk of Court visit the Lincoln Parish Important Addresses page.