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Welcome to East Baton Rouge Parish!

 

Welcome to East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana Genealogy & History Network. Our purpose is to provide free resources for genealogical and historical researchers. This site is FREE and will always be FREE to all researchers!
If you have genealogy or history information to share, send an email to genealogy@usghn.org and we will be pleased to include it here. If you have information for other Louisiana Parishes, please consider clicking on the Louisiana Genealogy & History Network link in the Main Menu and visit the appropriate parish. Thanks for visiting and good luck with your research!
 

 



 About East Baton Rouge Parish...

The second largest city in Louisiana, Baton Rouge was established as a military post by the French in 1719. Baton Rouge dates back to 1699, when French explorer Sieur d'Iberville leading an exploration party up the Mississippi River saw a reddish cypress pole festooned with bloody animals and fish that marked the boundary between the Native Houma and Bayou Goula tribal hunting grounds. They called the tree "le baton rouge," or red stick.

The native name for the site had been Istrouma. In 1810, when the Spanish were overthrown by local settlers, approximately 1,000 persons resided in the Baton Rouge vicinity. The people declared themselves independent and renamed this area the West Florida Republic. In a few months, the territory was annexed by Louisiana and was divided. At that time, in the year 1811 East Baton Rouge Parish was created. East Baton Rouge is one of the four parishes in the state of Louisiana to retain its original boundary lines.

In the year 1820, Baton Rouge was incorporated, and received its charter; since when, it has risen to the proportions of a city, and has become the capital of the State of Louisiana. The State-House at Baton Rouge was erected in 1847.

Several flags have flown over Baton Rouge since its founding. Those of France, England, Spain, West Florida, Louisiana, Confederate States of America, and the United States of America.

In 1699, French explorers discovered the area where Baton Rouge is now located. D'Iberville's writings refer to the area, as Istrouma or Red Stick, which when translated into French becomes Baton Rouge. Records of D'Iberville describe large reddened poles erected by Indians with fish and bear heads attached in sacrifice. These may have designated boundaries at a point separating the hunting grounds of the Bayou Goula and the Houma Indian tribes.

In 1718, the French are alleged to have constructed a fort near the area to protect travelers from New Orleans to northern outposts. The Baton Rouge area then belonged to France. The area was transferred to England by the treaty of Paris in 1763. Following this, the settlement was renamed New Richmond.

In September of 1779, the Spanish defeated the English at Fort Butte on Bayou Manchac and then captured Baton Rouge, so that by 1781 West Florida, including East Baton Rouge was under Spanish influence.

In 1810, when the Spanish were overthrown by local settlers, approximately 1,000 persons resided in the Baton Rouge vicinity. The people declared themselves independent and renamed this area the West Florida Republic. In a few months, the territory was annexed by Louisiana and was divided. At that time, East Baton Rouge Parish was created.

Louisiana was admitted into the Union on April 8, 1812. Baton Rouge was incorporated in 1817; it became the state capital in 1849.

For most of the duration of the Civil War 1861-1865, Baton Rouge was under Union control except for a brief period in 1862. During the war, the capital was relocated several times; however in 1882 the center of government was returned to Baton Rouge at that time the city had a population of 7,197.

At the turn of the century, the town began to develop industrially due to its strategic location on the first bluff along the Mississippi River north of the Gulf of Mexico. Baton Rouge, Louisiana's capital city is now 74.74 square miles in size with some 230,000 people. East Baton Rouge Parish population is approximately 412,500 and is 472.1 square miles in size.

The Baton Rouge Flag is a field of crimson representing the great Indian Nations that once inhabited the area. The crest on the lower left uses the red, white and blue representing the colors of the United States. The upper left of the shield is the Fleur-de-lis of France, the upper right is the Castille of Spain, and the lower potion is the Union Jack of Great Britain. The crest encompasses the emblems of the three foreign countries, whose flags have flown over Baton Rouge. The name "Baton Rouge" in white appears prominently on the field of crimson.

The parish has a total area of 471 square miles, of which 455 square miles is land and 16 square miles (3.21%) is water. The population recorded in the 1810 Federal Census was 1,468. The 2010 census recorded 440,171 residents in the Parish.

Neigboring parishes are East Feliciana Parish (north), West Feliciana Parish (northwest), West Baton Rouge Parish (west), Iberville Parish (south), Ascension Parish (southeast), Livingston Parish (east), and St. Helena Parish (northeast). Communities in the parish include Baton Rouge, Baywood, Brownfields, Gardere, Greenwell Springs, Inniswold, Merrydale, Monticello, Oak Hills Place, Old Jefferson, Port Hudson, Shenandoah, Village St. George, and Westminster.

 

 

 

 East Baton Rouge Parish Records


Birth Records - The Louisiana State office maintains records for 100 years after the date of birth. Birth records are considered confidential for the first 100 years. For current information on who may obtain a birth record as well as how to submit a request visit the Office of Public Health, Vital Records Registry website or write to them at PO Box 60630, New Orleans, LA 70160.

Birth records older than 100 years are available through the Louisiana State Archives, 3851 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, LA 70809. (225) 922-1000.

 

Death Records - The Louisiana State office maintains records for 100 years after the date of death. Death records are considered confidential for the first 100 years. For current information on who may obtain a death record as well as how to submit a request visit the Office of Public Health, Vital Records Registry website or write to them at PO Box 60630, New Orleans, LA 70160.

Death records older than 100 years are available through the Louisiana State Archives, 3851 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, LA 70809. (225) 922-1000.

 

Marriage Records - For current information on how to submit a request for a certified copy of an Orleans Parish marriage record less than 50 years old, see the Louisiana Office of Public Health Director, Vital Records and Statistics website or write to PO Box 60630, New Orleans, LA 70160.

Certified copies for the parish are issued by Clerk of Court. For the address of the parish Clerk of Court visit the East Baton Rouge Parish Important Addresses page.

Marriage records over 50 years are stored by the Louisiana State Archives, 3851 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, LA 70809. (225) 922-1000.

 

Divorce Records - To obtain current information on how to submit a request for a certified copy of divorce records contact the Clerk of Court. For the address of the parish Clerk of Court visit the East Baton Rouge Parish Important Addresses page.